Authors

Emanuelle Andrès, Souleymane Ba, Yannick M. Blec, Melba Joyce Boyd, Sabine Broeck, Michel Feith, Claude Le Fustec, Katharina Gerund, Paula von Gleich, Carsten Junker, Marie-Luise Löffler, Monica Michlin, Judith Misrahi-Barak, Stefanie Mueller, Claudine Raynaud, P. Khalil SaucierStefanie Schäfer, Christian Schmidt, Christina Sharpe, Samira Spatzek, Maria Varsam, Sebastian Weier, Frank B. Wilderson, III.

Emanuelle Andrès is an Associate Professor at the University of La Rochelle, France, where she teaches North-American culture and civilization, as well as translation. She wrote her PhD dissertation on Toni Morrison’s fiction from The Bluest Eye to A Mercy (Entre Sacrifice et Sacré: l’écriture de Toni Morrison, 2009). She is the co-editor of a book on Gloria Naylor’s writing (Writing In-between Apocalypse and Redemption, 2010) and has published several articles on Toni Morrison’s novels, especially on how the main themes explored by Morrison reflect upon her writing.
Contribution: “Reading/Writing ‘the most wretched business’: Toni Morrison’s A Mercy
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Souleymane Ba, Ph.D., is member of Etudes Montpelliéraines du Monde Anglophone (EMMA), Université Paul Valéry. He has held various teaching posts in the United States (as a Teaching Assistant at the State University of New York, in Geneseo, and at the University of Minnesota, in Minneapolis) and in France (as a Graduate Instructor (ATER) at Université Paul Valéry, and as a Faculty Adjunct at the Université d’Avignon et les Pays du Vaucluse). His essay on “John Henry: A Folk Hero in the Postmodern Era” appears in (Re)writing and Remembering by James Dalrymple et al. (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2016).
Contribution: “Afrofuturism in Contemporary African American Literature: Reading Colson Whitehead”
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Yannick M. Blec is a PhD candidate in African American literature at the Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée. His dissertation, entitled Le Blafringo-Arumerican dans l’œuvre de William Melvin Kelley: l’afro-américanité entre concept et expérience vécue (The Blafringo-Arumerican in William Melvin Kelley’s Works: African American Blackness between concept and lived experience), focuses on William Melvin Kelley’s depiction of Black identities during segregation and after throughout his works. He is also interested in the construction of identities, race relations, and transdisciplinary approach of literature among other things.
Contribution: “Rereading William Melvin Kelley: Black Identity Construction in the Light of an Africana Existentialist and Phenomenological Approach”
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Melba Joyce Boyd, poet, biographer, filmmaker and scholar, is a Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Africana Studies at Wayne State University in Detroit. She is the author of 13 books, 9 of which are poetry. Her most recent publication, Death Dance of a Butterfly (2012) received the 2013 Michigan Notable Book Award for Poetry. She has published over 60 essays on African American literature and culture.
Contribution: “The Ghost Got It Wrong: Frances E. W. Harper and Toni Morrison. A Century A/Part”
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Sabine Broeck is Professor of American Studies/Black Studies at the University of Bremen. Her work has continuously addressed the intersections of race, class, gender and sexualities, as well as questions of black diasporic experience; focusing at present on the impact of the transatlantic regime of enslavement on white Euro-American modern societies. She is currently acting as President of the international scholarly organization Collegium for African American Research (CAAR), and as director of the Institute for Postcolonial and Transcultural Studies (INPUTS) at the University of Bremen. She is working on a book contracted with SUNY Press: Gender and Anti-Blackness.
Contributions:
“Commentary (Response to Michel Feith)”
“A Dialogue: On European Borders, Black Movement, and the History of Social Death” (with P. Khalil Saucier)
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Michel Feith is an Associate Professor in American Literature at the University of Nantes, France, and a member of the Center for Research on National Identities and Intercultural Studies (CRINI). Publications include articles on Maxine Hong Kingston, Gerald Vizenor, John Edgar Wideman, Percival Everett and the Harlem Renaissance. Edited volumes include: with Geneviève Fabre, Jean Toomer and the Harlem Renaissance (2001); “Temples for Tomorrow”: Looking Back at the Harlem Renaissance (2001); Nationalismes et régionalismes: Amériques, Modes d’emploi (2008); Paroles de vainqueurs, paroles de vaincus: réécritures et revisions (2012).
Contribution: “Introduction: Weaving Texts and Memories: Around Toni Morrison’s Beloved”
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Claude Le Fustec is an Assistant Professor in (Afro-)American Literature at Rennes 2 University (France) and has conducted research in literature and spirituality. Her publications include the monograph Toni Cade Bambara: entre militantisme et fiction (2003), and, as an editor, several collections focusing on American and African American fiction, such as Lectures de Steinbeck, Les raisins de la colère (2007); and, with Sophie Marret, La fabrique du genre, (dé)constructions du féminin et du masculin dans les arts et la litérature Anglophones (2009). Her latest book, Northrop Frye and American Fiction, which deals with U.S. fiction and its relationship to transcendence via Frye’s study of the Bible and literature, will be published by the University of Toronto Press in 2014.
Contribution: “Beyond magic realism: the stuff of ordinary lives? Lorene Cary’s rewriting of Beloved”
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Katharina Gerund is an Assistant Professor of American Studies at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg. She is the author of Transatlantic Cultural Exchange: African American Women’s Art and Activism in West Germany (transcript, 2013) and the co-editor of Pirates, Drifters, Fugitives (Winter, 2012) and Revealing Tacit Knowledge (transcript, 2015). Her research interests include African American literature and culture, Americanization and reeducation after 1945, popular culture, gender studies, and feminist theory. She is currently working on a second book project, which examines the politics of sisterhood in US culture.
Contribution: “Searching for Sisterhood: Friendship and Sorority Culture in Tajuana Butler’s Sorority Sisters
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Paula von Gleich is a PhD candidate of American Studies at the department of Languages and Literatures (English-Speaking Cultures) at the University of Bremen. She received her master’s degree in Transnational Literary Studies and the bachelor’s degree in English-Speaking Cultures at the University of Bremen. Her dissertation project focuses on border concepts in contemporary African American theory and narratives of captivity and fugitivity since slavery until today. Her broader research interests include African American and Black diasporic literature and theory, critical race studies, and postcolonial and transnational literary studies.
Contribution: “‘The Inside-Outside of Civil Society’: An Interview with Frank B. Wilderson, III”
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Carsten Junker is faculty member of the department of Languages and Literatures (English-Speaking Cultures) at the University of Bremen, where he completed his Habilitation in 2015. He is currently filling in for the Chair of American Literature at Leipzig University. Junker obtained his doctorate in North American Literature and Culture from the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin in 2009, with a study on the essay as genre of cultural critique. Recent publications include Patterns of Positioning—On the Poetics of Early Abolition, Heidelberg: Winter, 2016; and, co-edited with Sabine Broeck, Postcoloniality—Decoloniality—Black Critique: Joints and Fissures, Frankfurt am Main/New York: Campus, 2014.
Contributions:
“Editors’ Note 1.1”
Editors Note 2.1
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Marie-Luise Löffler is faculty member of the department of Languages and Literatures (English-Speaking Cultures) at the University of Bremen. She is currently working on a post-doctoral project entitled “The Past and Present of Post-racial Discourses in the United States,” funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). She received her PhD from the American Studies Department of the University of Leipzig, Germany, in 2012, with a dissertation focusing on contemporary African American women’s vampire fiction.
Contributions:
“Editors’ Note 1.1”
“Editors’ Note 2.1”
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Monica Michlin is an Associate Professor of American studies at Paris-Sorbonne University. She has published a number of articles on African American literature (Toni Morrison, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Ernest Gaines, Sapphire), and a book entitled Jean Toomer: Cane (Paris: Klincksieck, 1997), her other fields of research being contemporary American film and TV series. She recently co-edited, with Jean-Paul Rocchi (Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée), the volume Black Intersectionalities: A Critique for the 21st Century, published by Liverpool UP and Chicago UP in 2013.
Contribution: “Writing/Reading Slavery as Trauma: Toni Morrison’s A Mercy
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Judith Misrahi-Barak is an Associate Professor at Paul-Valéry University Montpellier 3, where she teaches English and Postcolonial Literatures. Publications include a variety of articles on Caribbean writers and the Caribbean diaspora, published in Commonwealth, Moving World, Postcolonial Writing, Atlantic Studies among others. They also encompass book chapters in: La Ville plurielle dans la fiction antillaise anglophone (2000); Lignes d’horizon (2002); Voices and Silence in the Contemporary Novel in English (2009); Hybridation multiculturalisme postcolonialisme (2009); Littérature et esclavage (2010). She is the General Editor of PoCoPages.
Contribution: “Post-Beloved Writing: Review, Revitalize, Recalculate”
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Stefanie Mueller is an Assistant Professor in the English and American Studies Department at Goethe University Frankfurt am Main. Her main research interests include African American literature, the work of Pierre Bourdieu and Norbert Elias, the cultural history of corporations, and the interdisciplinary project of Law and Literature. Her publications include The Presence of the Past in the Novels of Toni Morrison (2013), as well as articles on American TV-series.
Contribution: “Standing Up To Words: Writing and Resistance in Toni Morrison’s A Mercy
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Claudine Raynaud is Professor of English and American Studies at the University Paul Valéry in Montpellier. She has taught in the UK (Birmingham and Liverpool) and the US (Michigan, Northwestern and Oberlin). A Fellow at the Du Bois Institute (Harvard, Fall 2005), she headed the French African American Studies Research Group created in 2004 and works at the CNRS. She is the author of Toni Morrison: L’Esthétique de la survie (1995) and numerous articles on black autobiography. Her publications include “Coming of Age in the African American Novel” (2004), ”Beloved or the Shifting Shapes of Memory” (2007) and an article on Hurston’s fieldtrip to Haiti (2013). She has published a series of essays in translation from the Harlem Renaissance (2013) and coedited Diasporas, Cultures of Mobilities, ‘Race’ (2014).
Contribution: “Memory Work”
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P. Khalil Saucier is Chair and Associate Professor of Africana Studies at Bucknell University. He is the author of Necessarily Black: Cape Verdean Youth, Hip-Hop Culture, and a Cri­tique of Identity, editor of Native Tongues: An African Hip-Hop Reader, and co-editor of On Marronage: Ethical Confrontations of Antiblackness.
Contribution: “A Dialogue: On European Borders, Black Movement, and the History of Social Death” (with Sabine Broeck)
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Stefanie Schäfer is an Assistant Professor of American Studies at FSU Jena. She received her PhD from the University of Heidelberg in 2009. She is the author of ’Just the Two of Us’: Self-Narration and Recognition in the Contemporary American Novel (2011), has co-edited books on subjectivity in contemporary culture and, most recently, the volume Fake Identity? The Impostor Narrative in North American Culture (forthcoming 2014). Her research interests include American popular literature and culture, narratology, as well as auto/biography and identity theory. She is currently preparing a monograph on the Yankee as an embodiment of American character throughout the nineteenth century and an article on the fashion politics of Michelle Obama.
Contribution: “Plantation Spaces and the Black Body: Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained as Maroon Narrative”
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Christian Schmidt is Assistant Professor for American and Intercultural Anglophone Studies at the University of Bayreuth. His Postblack Aesthetics: The Freedom to Be Black in Contemporary African American Fiction (forthcoming) analyzes the fiction of Paul Beatty, Trey Ellis, Percival Everett, Charles Johnson, and Adam Mansbach through the lens of postblackness, as do his essay publications on satire and the implied author. In addition to his work on African American literature, he has published on American country music and co-edited a special issue for the online journal ACT entitled Sounds of the Future: Musical and Sonic Anticipation in American Popular Culture.
Contribution: “The Parody of Postblackness in I Am Not Sidney Poitier and the End(s) of African American Literature”
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Christina Sharpe is an Associate Professor of English, Africana Studies, American Studies, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Tufts University. Her book Monstrous Intimacies: Making Post-Slavery Subjects was published in 2010 by Duke University Press.  She is currently working on several articles on ethics, representation, sound, and vision (visuality) as well as a book project titled In the Wake: On Blackness and Being. She has recently published in American Literary History, the premiere issue of Lateral (the online journal of the Cultural Studies Association), on the Sound Studies Sounding Out! and the Social Text Blogs.
Contribution: “The Lie at the Center of Everything”
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Samira Spatzek is a doctoral candidate at the department of English Speaking Cultures at Bremen University. She studied English-speaking Cultures and Linguistics (BA) and American Studies (MA) at the universities of Bremen and Groningen (NL). In her dissertation project she is working on Toni Morrison’s novel A Mercy (2008), looking at the novel as challenging our contemporary perception of central tenets of European Enlightenment, such as freedom, subjectivity, and citizenship. This project argues that those tenets need to be re-read from the perspective of a critique of the modern Western history of enslavement. Her broader research interests include critical race studies, cultural legal studies, and Black and postcolonial literary studies.
Contributions:
“‘Own Yourself, Woman’: Toni Morrison’s A Mercy, Early Modernity, and Property”
“‘The Inside-Outside of Civil Society’: An Interview with Frank B. Wilderson, III”
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Maria Varsam is an independent researcher who completed her doctoral research in American/Canadian Studies and Critical Theory at the University of Nottingham in 2010. Her research interests focus on literary and cinematic expressions of utopia and dystopia, history and memory, trauma and subjectivity, ethics and agency. Her contributions have appeared in collections such as Dark Horizons: Utopia and Dystopia at the Turn of the Century (2004) and Nowhere Somewhere: Writing, Space and the Construction of Utopia (2006).
Contribution: “Octavia Butler’s Kindred: Trauma, Memory, Utopia”
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Sebastian Weier studied Political Science and Transcultural Studies at the Universities of Bonn and Bremen, where he also wrote his Ph.D. thesis on “Cyborg Black Studies. Tracing the Impact of Technological Change on the Constitution of Blackness.” He is currently a post-doctoral researcher at the Universität des Saarlandes in Saarbrücken. Besides writing blogs on American Politics and Border Studies, his current research projects are concerned with mytho-politics, spectrality, as well as racialized State Terror and border-making and contestation. His main research interests include Critical Race Studies, U.S. American political culture, borders and border studies, new materialism and sound studies.
Contribution: “Disrupting Enslavist Suture: Black Film as a Cinema of Displeasure”
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Frank B. Wilderson, III is Professor of Drama and African American Studies at the University of California, Irvine, and the author of two books: the memoir Incognegro (2008) and the monograph Red, White and Black: Cinema and the Structure of U.S. Antagonisms (2010).
Contribution: “‘The Inside-Outside of Civil Society’: An Interview with Frank B. Wilderson, III”
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